Tag Archives: children

New Media Journalism Technology

One Laptop Per Child- Will You Help?

Only laptops can help the world’s poorest children who have no school to attend.

According to an article from the American Accounting Association, in January 2005, Nicholas Negroponte, founder of the MIT Media Lab, launched a research initiative to develop a $100 laptop for “the world’s poorest children.” This research initiative was called “One Laptop Per Child” or OPLC.

OLPC has a mission “to empower the world’s poorest children through education.” They believe when you give the gift of a laptop to a child, you are giving one more child a chance to succeed in life.

Negroponte stated that kids learn a great deal by themselves, and this is what made his team want to know just how much they learn on their own. So they turned their attention to the millions of children who have a scarce chance of attending primary school.

 

100 million kids worldwide who do not go to first grade. Most of them do not go because there is no school, there are no literate adults in their village, and there is little promise of that changing soon.

-Nicholas Negroponte –“Another Way to Think About Learning”

 

Today, you have the opportunity to help children who are much less fortunate to gain an education that will allow them to become essential citizens in their communities. Help provide a child with an education that will lead them to a brighter future.

Click here to donate towards a better education for children all over the world.

Help children like Zimi have a chance for a brighter future!

Listen to her story below.

Click here to donate today! 

References:

Roberts, A., & Zamora, V. L. (2012). One Laptop per Child: The $100 Challenge. Issues In Accounting Education27(3), 799-817. doi:10.2038/iace-50163

Negroponte, N. (2012). Another Way to Think about Learning. Technology Review115(6), 37.

 

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New Media Journalism Technology Toddlers and Tablets

Your Thoughts on Digital Learning in Early Education

Children utilizing a digital device in the classroom at Fayette Elementary School in Fayetteville, GA. Photo Credit: Amanda Golden
Children utilizing a digital device in a 2nd Grade classroom at Fayette Elementary School in Fayetteville, GA. Photo Credit: Amanda Golden

In response to the video and audio sample done in a previously written article, Profile: Educators Leading the Path to the Digital Future I did not receive too many responses. In fact, the one response I received was from one of the educators that I interviewed.  Going forward, to improve upon the amount of response I receive on video clips I produce, I will ask harder questions. The questions that I ask in the future will evoke a response from readers; whether it be a “hot topic” that parents may have very different views on or by using a broader topic with more in depth answers.

Pre-K Student using tablet at Nolan Elementary School. Photo credit: Amanda Golden
Pre-K Student using tablet at Nolan Elementary School. Photo credit: Amanda Golden

As a result of the surveys and polls conducted last week, I received 8 responses total.  As shown in the survey summary, there were several parents whose child attended a school with a Bring Your Own Device Program in place. Of these parents, many of them purchased their child a digital device between the ages of 3 to 5. It also was concluded almost unanimously that many parents see the use of digital technology continuing to grow over the next few years especially in regards to the school system.

During the previous week of the Social Media and Online Community Engagement Class I also published a discussion post to Reddit. This discussion titled “Digital Learning in GA Early Learning Schools: Good or Bad” yielded 25 Reddit “up-votes” and 5 very thought provoking responses.

I will share the response from one Reddit user: /r/jesusapproves below because this users’ comment accurately sums up what a lot of parents (that responded to the post) feel about the good and bad of digital learning.

Screen Capture of a comment from a reddit user in response to my discussion post in the subreddit of Praenting. Photo Credit: Amanda Golden
Screen Capture of a comment from a Reddit user in response to my discussion post in the sub-reddit of Parenting. Photo Credit: Amanda Golden

This response, in my opinion, pulls together the other points that parents gave on this discussion after his response.

Some of the major points that I took away from his response are:

* There are many advantages as well as disadvantages as to why one would want digital learning to be (or not be) involved in the educational system.

*   We are still living in a time where not everyone can afford to purchase these devices for their child; so in the event that schools do not provide a class set it would allow more chance for issues to arise.

*   There is still a need for the actual teacher to lecture in a traditional method as well as allow time for the use of devices in learning new concepts.

Overall, I would say that my audience responses were very informative. The responses allowed to me hear viewpoints that I had not considered. Some of the comments from the Reddit post even provided me with articles to use as a resource for further research. I would also like to thank the people who have responded to my articles, surveys and discussion posts for helping me gather data for further research on my Capstone Topic.

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New Media Journalism Technology Toddlers and Tablets

Survey: Digital Technology in GA Schools

The topic of Textbooks vs. Tablets in Georgia Schools is steadily on the rise; and we would like to know how you feel on the subject. Many schools in Georgia, as well as around the United States, have recently adopted the Bring Your Own Technology (BYOT) and the Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) initiatives. These programs are an effort to help raise test scores in the school system. The results of this survey are intended to analyze responses of how people really feel about this program being implemented into the schools.

This survey will be used to collect data on the thoughts of readers interested in how Digital Technology will affect Schools in Georgia. All responses to questions on the survey will remain anonymous. The survey will close on March 31, 2014.

The survey was initially sent out via email on March 17, 2014 and since then have had approximately 7 responses. Of these preliminary responses:

  • 71 percent have said “yes” their child attends a school with a BYOT/BYOD Program
  • 86 percent said that they use digital devices to help with their child’s education “daily”
  • 43 percent said their child got their first digital device between “ages 3-5”

When asked the open-ended question of where parents see the role of digital textbooks in relation to traditional textbooks in the next 3 years; the responses were very similar in nature. Responses were summarized to say the following: “the shift to full digital will happen sooner than we think. The fact that the curriculum can update more frequently beats out traditional books.”

In conclusion, the results of this survey will be used in the making of a final presentation on the data found on the topic of tablets vs. textbooks in Georgia Schools.

I would personally like to thank each and every one of my readers who took the time out to answer the survey questions.

If you have any questions, comments, or concerns about the topic or questions on the survey please feel free to email me at amandamgolden@fullsail.edu.

Create your free online surveys with SurveyMonkey , the world’s leading questionnaire tool.

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New Media Journalism Technology Toddlers and Tablets

Discussing Tablets vs Textbooks in GA Schools

This article will serve as an introduction to my Capstone Project for the New Media Journalism Masters Program at Full Sail University.

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New Media Journalism

Author recounts infamous 16th Street Bombing

Carolyn Maull Mckinstry is the author of “While the World Watched” and survivor of two of the 60 unsolved bombings in Birmingham, Alabama during the time of segregation.

Author Recounts Infamous 16th Street Bombing from Amanda Golden on Vimeo.

Monday, January 20, 2014, Rev. McKinstry was the keynote speaker for the annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Birthday Celebration sponsored by Fayette County NAACP Branch & Fayette County Board of Education in Fayetteville, GA.

Fayette County NAACP Branch President John E. Jones stated what he “really loves about this county, this community, is that no matter what is said or done, love still prevails.” There may be differences but we “work through them” continued Jones.

McKinstry referenced several times in her speech that she also believes the world can change but it “must begin with the practice of love.” She ended by stating that “we must learn to work together and to share with each other… we must treat all mankind with respect.”

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New Media Journalism Technology Toddlers and Tablets

iStartSmart Tablets Add New Learning Suite For iPad

Photo Credit: Hatch: The Early Learning Experts
Photo Credit: Hatch: The Early Learning Experts

Hatch: The Early Learning Experts has recently launched the newest addition to the iStartSmart Tablets, the iPad Learning Suite. Hatch is said to have broadened the horizons on how children are able to learn in the 21st century classroom.

These are students at Love T. Nolan Elementary School who are using the iStartSmart Tablet in a small group. Photo Credit: Amanda Golden
These are students at Love T. Nolan Elementary School who are using the iStartSmart Tablet in a small group. Photo Credit: Amanda Golden

The iStartSmart iPad Learning Suite is available in the Apple Store for free and includes all of the popular “Shell Squad Games” that teachers currently utilize in classrooms around the world.

In a previous article entitled “How iStartSmart Tablets Help Child Development,” you were told about the iStartSmart Tablet. This tablet, according to Hatch: The Early Learning Experts, “is the learning tablet that fascinates and engages” and is now a learning system that can be downloaded to a device other than the Hatch Tablets to help more students improve in the classroom.

Teacher assisting a child with the iStartSmart Tablet.  Photo Credit: Hatch: The Early Learning Experts
Teacher assisting a child with the iStartSmart Tablet.
Photo Credit: Hatch: The Early Learning Experts

Keenya Glover, a parent of a special-needs student in first grade says, “I think it’s a necessity! Due to the technology evolving at a rapid rate, children need to get ahead of the game.” With this program, children are taught the skills needed to prepare them for the next level.  Glover continued by saying, “using digital technology ASAP enhances the brain” so when her son began using the program at age three, she was very encouraged at the rate of his educational advancement.

The iStartSmart iPad Learning Suite still contains the same features as mentioned in my previous article; however, it is reported only available on the “Apple iPad Generation 2 or later.”  This makes it easier on many schools who have already integrated the iPad into their schools to incorporate Hatch Technology.

This is a child holding the iPad on the main student screen. Photo Credit: Hatch: The Early Learning Experts
This is a child holding the iPad on the main student screen. Photo Credit: Hatch: The Early Learning Experts

Hatch’s article followed up by saying that before the system rewards the child with more advanced activities, it wants to make sure that the skill has been demonstrated correctly. This is what separates the iStartSmart Learning System from other educational applications on digital devices. The program is designed so that “if a child struggles with an activity, the system will automatically intervene to help them move forward, or to refocus them on other skill levels necessary to master increasingly difficult concepts.”

These are the main characters of The Shell Squad Games  Photo Credit: Hatch: The Early Learning Experts
These are the main characters of The Shell Squad Games
Photo Credit: Hatch: The Early Learning Experts

 

 

 

Let’s meet the stars of this award-winning educational learning suite: Cami the Cameleon, Henry the Duck, and Platty the Platypus. According to the Hatch website, these characters “guide the child-directed play.” The characters guide the children on many adventures to enhance the typical lesson taught in the classroom. 

Original Infographic created by: Amanda Golden  Information was gathered from research by Hatch: The Early Learning Experts
Original Infographic created by: Amanda Golden
Information was gathered from research by Hatch: The Early Learning Experts

 

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New Media Journalism

Atlanta’s First Global Winter Wonderland

Atlanta’s First Global Winter Wonderland from Amanda Golden on Vimeo.

Atlanta, GA- The first Atlanta debut of the Global Winter Wonderland event is being held at Turner Field from November 21, 2013 – January 5, 2014 nightly from 5pm to 11pm. Global Winter Wonderland is a multicultural lantern festival based on the original Chinese lantern festivals. The Global Winter Wonderland first debuted in the US in Santa Clara California in 2011. A Festival of Lights that, according to the Atlanta Wonderland website, “will enable patrons to “travel the world in one day” by viewing large replicas of the world’s most famous landmarks such as India’s Taj Mahal, Paris’s Eiffel Tower, Mexico’s Chichen Itza, San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge and more.” The Global Winter Wonderland also features a diverse variety of arts and crafts, dance and musical performances, carnival rides, arcades, booths, international foods, and shopping. The Atlanta Global Winter Wonderland will also host performances by the famous UniverSoul Circus Thursday through Sunday nights with shows starting at 6pm for all ages to enjoy. For more information on The Global Winter Wonderland; its special events, hours, booths, where they will debut next or even to purchase tickets for an upcoming show please visit globalwonderland.com.

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New Media Journalism

Digital Citizenship: Protecting Digital Footprints

Digital Citizenship 

When it comes to online safety many schools in Fayetteville, Ga have come up with a Digital Citizenship Program to protect the students from potential Internet harm. Digital citizenship is defined as a way to keep kids safe while online. According to commonsense.org it teaches students to: “protect private information, respect themselves and others, stay safe online, stand up to cyber bullying when they see it happen and to balance the time they spend on these devices and other media.” Fayette Elementary School Technology Specialist, Regina Yeargin told us about how they have incorporated Digital Citizenship at their school.

 

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New Media Journalism

Book Character Parade Not a Halloween Parade: Promoting Literacy at all Ages

Fayetteville, GA- Fayette Elementary School is a Pre-Kindergarten to Fifth Grade school this year. A combination of Hood Avenue Primary (Pre-k to 2nd) and Fayette Intermediate School (3rd to 5th) due to budget cuts in the school system; this new school still continued tradition of the Annual Book Character Parade this year. In previous years’ Pre-School to grades 2 were able to participate in the alternate Halloween Costume Parade; however this year it was limited to the lower grades up to 1st grade. Students were encouraged to do a “Story web” of their favorite book and come in on October 31, 2013 wearing original costumes of their favorite character from that book to parade around the school that morning. The upper grades completed their “story webs” and could only bring in a pumpkin decorated from their favorite book character. Students from all grades, Parents, Teachers and Administrators gathered in the halls on October 31, 2013 after the morning announcements to watch the highly anticipated Book Character Parade pass by!

Fayetteville, GA- Pre Kindergarten students at Fayette Elementary School prepare for the Annual Book Character Parade. Held every year for grades Pre-K through 1st grade on October 31st. In the place of celebrating Halloween at school they celebrate a safe alternative that promotes reading at an early age.
Fayetteville, GA- Pre Kindergarten students at Fayette Elementary School prepare for the Annual Book Character Parade. Held every year for grades Pre-K through 1st grade on October 31st. In the place of celebrating Halloween at school they celebrate a safe alternative that promotes reading at an early age.
Fayetteville, GA- Teachers and Students from Kindergarten and 1st Grade at Fayette Elementary School showcase their favorite book character in the Annual Book Character Parade. Held every year for grades Pre-K through 1st grade on October 31st in the place of celebrating Halloween at school they celebrate a safe alternative that promotes reading at an early age.
Fayetteville, GA- Teachers and Students from Kindergarten and 1st Grade at Fayette Elementary School showcase their favorite book character in the Annual Book Character Parade. Held every year for grades Pre-K through 1st grade on October 31st in the place of celebrating Halloween at school they celebrate a safe alternative that promotes reading at an early age.
Fayetteville, GA- Students at Fayette Elementary School in grades 2-5 watch with anticipation the Annual Book Character Parade. Held every year for grades Pre-K through 1st grade on October 31st. In the place of celebrating Halloween at school they celebrate a safe alternative that promotes reading at an early age.
Fayetteville, GA- Students at Fayette Elementary School in grades 2-5 watch with anticipation the Annual Book Character Parade. Held every year for grades Pre-K through 1st grade on October 31st. In the place of celebrating Halloween at school they celebrate a safe alternative that promotes reading at an early age. Photo Credit: Amanda Golden
Fayetteville, GA- Fayette Elementary School student dressed as Cruella Deville from Disney's "101 Dalmations" proudly walks at the Annual Book Character Parade. Held every year for grades Pre-K through 1st grade on October 31st in the place of celebrating Halloween at school they celebrate a safe alternative that promotes reading at an early age.
Fayetteville, GA- Fayette Elementary School student dressed as Cruella Deville from Disney’s “101 Dalmations” proudly walks at the Annual Book Character Parade. Held every year for grades Pre-K through 1st grade on October 31st in the place of celebrating Halloween at school they celebrate a safe alternative that promotes reading at an early age. Photo Credit: Amanda Golden
Fayetteville, GA- Student at Fayette Elementary School who chose the book "Cloudy with a chance of Meatballs" showcases his homemade costume for the Annual Book Character Parade. Held every year for grades Pre-K through 1st grade on October 31st in the place of celebrating Halloween at school they celebrate a safe alternative that promotes reading at an early age.
Fayetteville, GA- Student at Fayette Elementary School who chose the book “Cloudy with a chance of Meatballs” showcases his homemade costume for the Annual Book Character Parade. Held every year for grades Pre-K through 1st grade on October 31st in the place of celebrating Halloween at school they celebrate a safe alternative that promotes reading at an early age. Photo Credit: Amanda Golden

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New Media Journalism Toddlers and Tablets

Children and Smart Technology: The Way of the Future

  6-year-old student using technology to learn letters. Photo By: Amanda Golden

6-year-old student using technology to learn letters. Photo By: Amanda Golden

The question isn’t whether technology is the way of the future, but *what* technology will best serve us; and least harm us – Matt Peckham, writer for Time.com

Peckham states in his article, “the jury on tablet and smartphone use by young children was out 1½ years ago; it’s still out in early 2013, the consensus currently being that these devices work best when they’re employed as complementary to parental interaction, say, as conversation starters (as opposed to conversation enders, or simply babysitters).” According to his article this has become a concern for many parents both new and seasoned over the past few years.

Many schools (and even daycares) around the world have begun to incorporate technology in some way or another into their daily instructional time to help better serve children. The most popular technological device added being the iPad. Teachers have used them to teach patterns, letters and even mathematics to their students; and children as young as 18 months old have even been observed using these devices to their advantage.

Peckham mentioned that the use of Smart technology “probably doesn’t matter in the very early years, when the most important thing for the still-developing child brain is coming to grips with reality itself.” But he and his family have been having conversations about school systems integrating technology earlier and earlier in the lessons and he says, “in short, I feel good about any school system that implements research-supported technological tools.”

Sample Math App for Kids on the iPad. Photo by: Amanda Golden
Sample Math App for Kids on the iPad. Photo by: Amanda Golden

Fulton County Schools Kindergarten teacher, Michaela Boggs, states that even though they do use Smart Devices in her classroom that, “they need to have a teacher teaching them still, an iPad should never replace a teacher in the classroom.” Boggs allows her kindergarten students to use the iPad “at stations, for listening in reading, or for counting or using strategies in math. They love it and they truly learn from USING a skill, rather than just hearing about it.” The students seem  “to catch on quickly while using technology!” exclaims Boggs.

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