Tag Archives: FES

New Media Journalism Technology

Profile: Educators Leading the Path to the Digital Future

Connie D. Perkins is currently a first grade teacher in Fayette County Schools and has been teaching for over 26 years. Perkins has a Reading Specialist Degree that has allowed her to teach one-on-one reading with students who needed the help. She also taught Early Intervention Program (EIP) curriculum for reading two years, and Perkins mentioned that she “has worked a lot with children who struggle in reading.”

With the many years of teaching experience in early education, Perkins stated that she has seen a major difference in the way that children grasp reading and math skills over the years. She remembers when they would use flash cards to learn new concepts and how it would take weeks for them to master the concepts, and now those same skills when applied from the iPad or the computer are learned “just like that,” she continued. Perkins stated that the children “love iPads in their classroom!” She utilizes the iPad to introduce and reinforce the lessons they will be doing throughout the week. “The children now have access to the reading book and all the skills we do in class. They can go home and do it online,” says Perkins. “They think it’s a big deal to be able to go ahead of us or read extra books related to the class lessons while at home.”

Perkins finished by saying that she could see the schools “doing away with textbooks and going digital someday,” believing that students will think “outside the box when manipulating tools on digital technology.”

1st Grade Teacher Discusses Digital Technology from Amanda Golden on Vimeo.

 

Heather Cox has been a fourth grade teacher and leader of technology in Fulton County Schools for the past 10 years. Upon gaining employment with Fulton Schools, Cox said that she became a “leadership member and any other kind of committee member that had anything to do with technology.” This included the Inaugural Technology Leadership Forum for Fulton County Schools where she helped to launch the Bring Your Own Technology (BYOT) Pilot Program in her school. Though she initially met resistance, she eventually helped everyone to understand what the program was really about.

Cox stated that last year while on her professional Twitter page, she saw an article that was linked to the nomination form for the White House Champions of Change Program for ConnectEd Leaders. After she read over the description, she sent an email to her students’ parents to see if they would nominate her. To her surprise, Cox heard back from the White House a few months later saying that she had “like 20 nominations,” so they wanted to get a little more information about her. From there, Cox was chosen to be 1 of the 10 people who would be honored as a ConnectEd Leader in the White House Champions of Change Program. Cox said that it was incredible to go and get to meet other ConnectEd Educators and it happened “all through the power of Twitter.”

5,369 total views, 1 views today

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinmailby feather
New Media Journalism Technology

Integrating Technology in the Classroom Past to Present

Student at Fayette Elementary School in Fayetteville, GA using the iPad for a math lesson. Photo Credit: Amanda Golden
Student at Fayette Elementary School in Fayetteville, GA using the iPad for a math lesson.
Photo Credit: Amanda Golden

Technology has vastly changed over the past 40 years, especially in the classroom.  Teachers no longer use typewriters, abacus’, pencil and paper as a main classroom tool. Instead we find tools like computers, tablets and styluses to complete assignments.

  

Scholastic Reading Test Module on a student computer at Fayette Elementary School in Fayetteville, GA. Photo Credit: Amanda Golden
Scholastic Reading Test Module on a student computer at Fayette Elementary School in Fayetteville, GA.
Photo Credit: Amanda Golden

“Educators can leverage new educational tools to personalize learning, encourage collaboration, and prepare students for the future,” according to author Susie Boss in an article at edutopia.org.

 

Mr. Carl Golden, Sr. a Fulton County Schools Technology Specialist in College Park, GA. Photo Credit: Amanda Golden
Mr. Carl Golden, Sr. a Fulton County Schools Technology Specialist in College Park, GA. Photo Credit: Amanda Golden

Mr. Carl Golden, Sr. a Fulton County Schools Technology Specialist (in College Park, GA) recalled memories from 1970, when he began in the school system, where they basically only had “typewriters, calculators, paper and pens” to be considered a form of technology.

 

A set of 6 student computer for use with students at Fayette Elementary School in Fayetteville, GA. Photo Credit: Amanda Golden
A set of 6 student computer for use with students at Fayette Elementary School in Fayetteville, GA.
Photo Credit: Amanda Golden

Golden went on to discuss how in the 1980’s the first computer he was exposed to in education was the “Apple One” and the “Apple Two” computers that had a floppy disk drive with drills to help students improve in the classroom.

Golden also shared his memories of being one of the “first teachers during that time” in 1995 to be trained in technology for the schools. Let’s listen:

Mrs. Gwendolyn Golden, Second Grade teacher at Fayette Elementary School in Fayetteville, GA doing a math lesson on the iPad.  Photo Credit: Amanda Golden
Mrs. Gwendolyn Golden, Second Grade teacher at Fayette Elementary School in Fayetteville, GA doing a math lesson on the iPad.
Photo Credit: Amanda Golden

Mrs. Gwendolyn Golden, a second grade teacher in Fayette County Schools, also noted that during her tenure in school she had to use a typewriter in class- not a computer. This is very different from today she continued saying, “today in my second grade classroom where I teach, we have 6 student computers, a mobile iPad lab, and we also have responders for the students to interact with answering question during lessons.”

15,380 total views, 1 views today

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinmailby feather
New Media Journalism

Digital Citizenship: Protecting Digital Footprints

Digital Citizenship 

When it comes to online safety many schools in Fayetteville, Ga have come up with a Digital Citizenship Program to protect the students from potential Internet harm. Digital citizenship is defined as a way to keep kids safe while online. According to commonsense.org it teaches students to: “protect private information, respect themselves and others, stay safe online, stand up to cyber bullying when they see it happen and to balance the time they spend on these devices and other media.” Fayette Elementary School Technology Specialist, Regina Yeargin told us about how they have incorporated Digital Citizenship at their school.

 

10,586 total views, no views today

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinmailby feather

Copyright © 2017 amandamscisney.com. All Rights Reserved.