Tag Archives: New Media Journalism

New Media Journalism Technology Toddlers and Tablets

Discussing Tablets vs Textbooks in GA Schools

This article will serve as an introduction to my Capstone Project for the New Media Journalism Masters Program at Full Sail University.

7,756 total views, no views today

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinmailby feather
New Media Journalism Technology

Integrating Technology in the Classroom Past to Present

Student at Fayette Elementary School in Fayetteville, GA using the iPad for a math lesson. Photo Credit: Amanda Golden
Student at Fayette Elementary School in Fayetteville, GA using the iPad for a math lesson.
Photo Credit: Amanda Golden

Technology has vastly changed over the past 40 years, especially in the classroom.  Teachers no longer use typewriters, abacus’, pencil and paper as a main classroom tool. Instead we find tools like computers, tablets and styluses to complete assignments.

  

Scholastic Reading Test Module on a student computer at Fayette Elementary School in Fayetteville, GA. Photo Credit: Amanda Golden
Scholastic Reading Test Module on a student computer at Fayette Elementary School in Fayetteville, GA.
Photo Credit: Amanda Golden

“Educators can leverage new educational tools to personalize learning, encourage collaboration, and prepare students for the future,” according to author Susie Boss in an article at edutopia.org.

 

Mr. Carl Golden, Sr. a Fulton County Schools Technology Specialist in College Park, GA. Photo Credit: Amanda Golden
Mr. Carl Golden, Sr. a Fulton County Schools Technology Specialist in College Park, GA. Photo Credit: Amanda Golden

Mr. Carl Golden, Sr. a Fulton County Schools Technology Specialist (in College Park, GA) recalled memories from 1970, when he began in the school system, where they basically only had “typewriters, calculators, paper and pens” to be considered a form of technology.

 

A set of 6 student computer for use with students at Fayette Elementary School in Fayetteville, GA. Photo Credit: Amanda Golden
A set of 6 student computer for use with students at Fayette Elementary School in Fayetteville, GA.
Photo Credit: Amanda Golden

Golden went on to discuss how in the 1980’s the first computer he was exposed to in education was the “Apple One” and the “Apple Two” computers that had a floppy disk drive with drills to help students improve in the classroom.

Golden also shared his memories of being one of the “first teachers during that time” in 1995 to be trained in technology for the schools. Let’s listen:

Mrs. Gwendolyn Golden, Second Grade teacher at Fayette Elementary School in Fayetteville, GA doing a math lesson on the iPad.  Photo Credit: Amanda Golden
Mrs. Gwendolyn Golden, Second Grade teacher at Fayette Elementary School in Fayetteville, GA doing a math lesson on the iPad.
Photo Credit: Amanda Golden

Mrs. Gwendolyn Golden, a second grade teacher in Fayette County Schools, also noted that during her tenure in school she had to use a typewriter in class- not a computer. This is very different from today she continued saying, “today in my second grade classroom where I teach, we have 6 student computers, a mobile iPad lab, and we also have responders for the students to interact with answering question during lessons.”

15,301 total views, no views today

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinmailby feather
New Media Journalism

Creative Commons License: Protect your Creative Expression

Protect creative expression. Photo/drawing by: Amanda Golden
Protect creative expression. Photo/drawing by: Amanda Golden

Creative Commons Licenses “work alongside copyright and enable you to modify your copyright terms to best suit your needs.” Before applying a Creative Commons License to your work you must first know that your work is indeed “protected by copyright.” A Creative Commons License applies to works that are protected by copyright. There are several kinds of works protected by copyright some of which are books, websites, blogs, and photographs. For a more exhaustive list please refer to the copyright website.

According to the Creative Commons Organization, there are several sets of conditions that an author may apply to their work.

The list of conditions from their page is listed below:

attributionAttribution. You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your copyrighted work — and derivative works based upon it — but only if they give credit the way you request.

noncommNoncommercial. You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your work — and derivative works based upon it — but for noncommercial purposes only.

nderNo Derivative Works. You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform only verbatim copies of your work, not derivative works based upon it.

shalikeShare Alike. You allow others to distribute derivative works only under a license identical to the license that governs your work.

When applying a Creative Commons (CC) to your work if violated, “it’s an infringement the same as if there were no license at all,” according to Copyright & Plagiarism Consultant, Jonathan Bailey. For example, Bailey stated that he doesn’t allow commercial use of his work so if someone violates that and sells it, “it’s an infringement as the license doesn’t cover the use at all.”

                                     This is an example of a page with a CC License. Photo/Screenshot by: Amanda Golden
This is an example of a page with a CC License. Photo/Screenshot by: Amanda Golden

There are still “mixed” reviews on experiences with the CC that even Bailey can attest to. There have been a few sites that have misused his content thinking that they were “complying with the license.” Still, overall, Bailey states that his experience “has been good, with many sites also using the content as intended and in a way that at least complies with the majority and the spirit of the license.”

  Know your Rights. Photo by: Amanda Golden
Know your Rights. Photo by: Amanda Golden

However, the CC license has “enabled a lot of reuse that I think was mutually beneficial,” stated Bailey. It is all in how you set up your license to how it will operate for you because, according to the CC webpage, “one final thing you should understand about Creative Commons licenses is that they are all non-exclusive. This means that you can permit the general public to use your work under a Creative Commons license and then enter into a separate and different non-exclusive license with someone else, for example, in exchange for money.”

5,549 total views, no views today

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinmailby feather

Copyright © 2017 amandamscisney.com. All Rights Reserved.